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The biggest car insurance companies, ranked by price

Screen Shot 2019 03 24 At 9.45.59 Pm
Screen Shot 2019 03 24 At 9.45.59 Pm

One of the best ways to get cheap car insurance is by comparing car insurance quotes — and the companies offering them. To get you started, NerdWallet looked at car insurance prices across the country for different driver profiles and coverage levels to find the cheapest rates. We’ve sliced the data in several ways to give you an idea of average costs and what factors might nudge your car insurance rate up — or even better, down.

The biggest car insurance companies, ranked by price

Below are average rates among all states for the seven largest auto insurers in the United States. USAA, the cheapest, isn’t ranked because it’s not available to everyone.

ust seven car insurance companies make up 65% of the U.S. market for individual auto policies. They are Allstate, Farmers, Geico, Liberty Mutual, Progressive and State Farm, which are available to anyone, and USAA, the insurer for active military members, veterans and their families.

NerdWallet compared quotes from these insurers in ZIP codes across the country. Rates are for policies that include liability, collision, comprehensive, and uninsured/underinsured motorist coverages, as well as any other coverage required in each state. Our “good driver” profile is a 40-year-old with no moving violations and credit in the “good” tier.

Keep in mind these are averages from across the country, so rates in your area will differ. Credit history and at-fault accidents can heavily impact insurance rates — use the tabs below to compare rates for additional driver types.

Recap: Cheapest of the big insurance companies

  • State Farm: Cheapest for good drivers, drivers with one at-fault crash and minimum coverage.
  • Geico: Cheapest for good drivers with bad credit.
  • USAA: Cheapest for military members, veterans and their families.

Cheap rates from small insurers

Finding cheap car insurance doesn’t mean you have to stick with large insurance companies. Regional and small insurers may beat the lowest offers from the big guys, and often have great customer service.

Below are annual average rates from some small car insurance companies, according to our analysis.


$524/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: GA, IL, IN, IA, KY, MI, MN, OH, PA, SC, TN, VA, WI.

$771/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: DC, IL, IN, KY, NY, NC, OH, PA, TN, VA, WV, WI.

$949/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: AZ, CA, CT, FL, ID, IN, KY, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NY, OH, OR, PA, RI, TN, VT, WA.

$1,248/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: AL, AK, AZ, CO, GA, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, MN, MO, NV, ND, OK, OR, TN, WA, WI.

We chose these companies because of their low rates and availability in multiple states, but there may be cheaper options in your state. For example, there are many Farm Bureau insurance companies available only in a single state — and they were often cheapest in our state-by-state analysis this year.

Cheapest car insurance in your state

Cheap car insurance sounds great to everyone, but doesn’t mean the same thing everywhere. Rates vary widely from one state to the next. To get a good benchmark for price comparisons, check out average rates in your state.

Cheapest overall: Liability-only car insurance

The cheapest car insurance, period, will likely be the minimum coverage required in your state. In most states this is liability insurance only, which covers property damage and medical bills for others due to accidents you cause. Some states also require uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, which pay for your injuries or damage if an at-fault driver doesn’t have enough insurance.

Policies with comprehensive and collision coverage are pricier, but cover you in case your car is stolen or damaged, no matter who (or what) caused it. When you add these to liability and uninsured/underinsured coverages, it’s commonly considered “full coverage.”

» MORE: Find cheap full coverage car insurance

To get an idea of the price difference, NerdWallet looked at quotes for the minimum required insurance in each state and compared them to average full coverage prices.

How to get the cheapest possible insurance

No matter who your auto insurance company is, here are tips for saving on your policy:

  1. Look for discounts — even ask for them. There could be discounts you’re not taking advantage of. For instance, maybe you retired and are driving less than when you bought your policy. Mention it and you might get a low-mileage discount.
  2. Rethink insurance limits and deductibles. A higher collision and comprehensive deductible might make sense if you rarely drive or are financially comfortable with the risk. Raising deductibles means you’d owe more out of pocket if you had to file a comprehensive or collision claim, but it’s a surefire way to get cheaper car insurance.
  3. Know when to cut coverage. Don’t strip away coverage just for the sake of a lower price. You’ll need full coverage car insurance to satisfy the terms of an auto loan, and you’ll want it as long as your car would be a financial burden to replace. But for older cars, you can drop comprehensive and collision coverage, which only pay out up to your car’s current value, minus the deductible.
  4. Cash in on major life changes. Certain life events could translate to cheaper car insurance. For instance, many companies offer a lower rate for married couples or domestic partners. Or perhaps you moved to a suburb with lower accident and crime rates. If your risk for accidents goes down, your rates just might, too.

NerdWallet’s car insurance comparison tool makes it easy to see top companies side-by-side.

The biggest car insurance companies, ranked by price

One of the best ways to get cheap car insurance is by comparing car insurance quotes — and the companies offering them. To get you started, NerdWallet looked at car insurance prices across the country for different driver profiles and coverage levels to find the cheapest rates. We’ve sliced the data in several ways to give you an idea of average costs and what factors might nudge your car insurance rate up — or even better, down.

Below are average rates among all states for the seven largest auto insurers in the United States. USAA, the cheapest, isn’t ranked because it’s not available to everyone.

Below are average rates among all states for the seven largest auto insurers in the United States. USAA, the cheapest, isn’t ranked because it’s not available to everyone.

Just seven car insurance companies make up 65% of the U.S. market for individual auto policies. They are Allstate, Farmers, Geico, Liberty Mutual, Progressive and State Farm, which are available to anyone, and USAA, the insurer for active military members, veterans and their families.

NerdWallet compared quotes from these insurers in ZIP codes across the country. Rates are for policies that include liability, collision, comprehensive, and uninsured/underinsured motorist coverages, as well as any other coverage required in each state. Our “good driver” profile is a 40-year-old with no moving violations and credit in the “good” tier.

Keep in mind these are averages from across the country, so rates in your area will differ. Credit history and at-fault accidents can heavily impact insurance rates — use the tabs below to compare rates for additional driver types.

Recap: Cheapest of the big insurance companies

  • State Farm: Cheapest for good drivers, drivers with one at-fault crash and minimum coverage.
  • Geico: Cheapest for good drivers with bad credit.
  • USAA: Cheapest for military members, veterans and their families.

Cheap rates from small insurers

Finding cheap car insurance doesn’t mean you have to stick with large insurance companies. Regional and small insurers may beat the lowest offers from the big guys, and often have great customer service.

Below are annual average rates from some small car insurance companies, according to our analysis.


$524/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: GA, IL, IN, IA, KY, MI, MN, OH, PA, SC, TN, VA, WI.

$771/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: DC, IL, IN, KY, NY, NC, OH, PA, TN, VA, WV, WI.

$949/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: AZ, CA, CT, FL, ID, IN, KY, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NY, OH, OR, PA, RI, TN, VT, WA.

$1,248/year for good drivers.

  • Available in: AL, AK, AZ, CO, GA, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, MN, MO, NV, ND, OK, OR, TN, WA, WI.

We chose these companies because of their low rates and availability in multiple states, but there may be cheaper options in your state. For example, there are many Farm Bureau insurance companies available only in a single state — and they were often cheapest in our state-by-state analysis this year.

Cheapest car insurance in your state

Cheap car insurance sounds great to everyone, but doesn’t mean the same thing everywhere. Rates vary widely from one state to the next. To get a good benchmark for price comparisons, check out average rates in your state.

Cheapest overall: Liability-only car insurance

The cheapest car insurance, period, will likely be the minimum coverage required in your state. In most states this is liability insurance only, which covers property damage and medical bills for others due to accidents you cause. Some states also require uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, which pay for your injuries or damage if an at-fault driver doesn’t have enough insurance.

Policies with comprehensive and collision coverage are pricier, but cover you in case your car is stolen or damaged, no matter who (or what) caused it. When you add these to liability and uninsured/underinsured coverages, it’s commonly considered “full coverage.”

» MORE: Find cheap full coverage car insurance

To get an idea of the price difference, NerdWallet looked at quotes for the minimum required insurance in each state and compared them to average full coverage prices.

How to get the cheapest possible insurance

No matter who your auto insurance company is, here are tips for saving on your policy:

  1. Look for discounts — even ask for them. There could be discounts you’re not taking advantage of. For instance, maybe you retired and are driving less than when you bought your policy. Mention it and you might get a low-mileage discount.
  2. Rethink insurance limits and deductibles. A higher collision and comprehensive deductible might make sense if you rarely drive or are financially comfortable with the risk. Raising deductibles means you’d owe more out of pocket if you had to file a comprehensive or collision claim, but it’s a surefire way to get cheaper car insurance.
  3. Know when to cut coverage. Don’t strip away coverage just for the sake of a lower price. You’ll need full coverage car insurance to satisfy the terms of an auto loan, and you’ll want it as long as your car would be a financial burden to replace. But for older cars, you can drop comprehensive and collision coverage, which only pay out up to your car’s current value, minus the deductible.
  4. Cash in on major life changes. Certain life events could translate to cheaper car insurance. For instance, many companies offer a lower rate for married couples or domestic partners. Or perhaps you moved to a suburb with lower accident and crime rates. If your risk for accidents goes down, your rates just might, too.

Non-owner car insurance provides liability coverage when you don’t have a car and drive one that isn’t yours. Liability coverage pays for injuries and property damage you cause to others in a car accident. However, it doesn’t cover any damage to the car you’ve borrowed or rented, nor does it pay for any of your own injuries if you cause a crash.

Beware: If you borrow a car from a relative or someone in your home, non-owner car insurance isn’t the right choice — you should be listed on the car owner’s policy. Depending on their insurer and your state, this might be required even if the car belongs to an unrelated roommate, and even if you don’t currently have a valid license.

How to buy non-owner car insurance

To get a quote, you’ll need to make a call or visit an agent. Insurers don’t tend to offer non-owner insurance quotes online, and some, like Progressive, offer them only to existing customers. And though most large insurers offer non-owner car insurance, Allstate does not.

We’ve verified that the insurers below offer non-owner policies, but some don’t offer information online and most say the best way to get a policy is to find an agent.

Company Call for a quote Find an agent
Insurers that offer the non-owner car coverage may not sell it in every state.

*USAA sells insurance only to active military members, veterans and their families.

Acceptance Insurance 877-405-7102  

 

American Family 800-692-6326  

 

Dairyland Insurance 844-242-4468  

 

Direct Auto Insurance 877-463-4732  

 

Farmers 888-327-6335  

 

Geico 800-207-7847  

 

Liberty Mutual 800-699-3534  

 

Nationwide 877-669-6877  

 

State Farm 800-782-8332  

 

Travelers 800-842-5075  

 

USAA* 800-531-8722  

 

What non-owner car insurance covers

A non-owner car insurance policy typically includes only the required coverage types in your state, though you can select limits higher than the minimums. These may include:

  • Liability coverage for property damage and injuries you cause to others, except your passengers.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist protection, which pays out if you’re injured in an accident caused by a driver without any or enough liability insurance.
  • Medical payments or personal injury protection, which pay for your injuries after a wreck no matter who is at fault.

Non-owner insurance doesn’t include collision or comprehensive insurance. In a standard auto policy, that coverage pays for repairs or replacement of the vehicle you own.

Who needs non-owner car insurance

You might want a non-owner insurance policy if you don’t own a vehicle and you:

  • Need an SR-22 form filed on your behalf — or an FR-44 form in Florida and Virginia — to get your driver’s license reinstated. These forms are filed by insurers and prove that you have car insurance after a serious conviction like a DUI.
  • Your state requires insurance to get or reinstate a drivers license. Some states do so under what is sometimes called a “proof of financial responsibility” law.
  • Use a service such as Zipcar or Car2Go: A non-owner policy supplements the liability coverage the car-sharing service provides, typically the minimum-required amount in your state. If you cause a bad wreck, costs could easily exceed those limits and you’d be responsible for them.
  • Want to maintain continuous auto insurance coverage: Going without coverage — even between cars — makes you look risky in the eyes of insurers, leading to higher rates when you buy a vehicle.
  • Rent cars frequently: Non-owner insurance might be cheaper than paying for liability coverage at the rental counter if you rent often enough. It won’t cover damage to the rental, but you may be able to get that coverage through a credit card or buy the collision-damage waiver from the rental car company.
  • Borrow other people’s cars often: The car owner’s insurance normally pays out for an accident, but if costs exceed the owner’s liability limits, you’d be on the hook for the remainder.

Cost of a non-owner policy

Typically, a non-owner car insurance policy costs less than what you would pay for the same level of liability coverage for a car you own. However, if you need the insurer to file an SR-22 or FR-44, costs will likely be high for any policy until you don’t need it anymore.

The price depends on your age, driving record and how often you plan to drive, in addition to other factors.

Non-owner car insurance provides liability coverage when you don’t have a car and drive one that isn’t yours. Liability coverage pays for injuries and property damage you cause to others in a car accident. However, it doesn’t cover any damage to the car you’ve borrowed or rented, nor does it pay for any of your own injuries if you cause a crash.

Beware: If you borrow a car from a relative or someone in your home, non-owner car insurance isn’t the right choice — you should be listed on the car owner’s policy. Depending on their insurer and your state, this might be required even if the car belongs to an unrelated roommate, and even if you don’t currently have a valid license.

How to buy non-owner car insurance

To get a quote, you’ll need to make a call or visit an agent. Insurers don’t tend to offer non-owner insurance quotes online, and some, like Progressive, offer them only to existing customers. And though most large insurers offer non-owner car insurance, Allstate does not.

We’ve verified that the insurers below offer non-owner policies, but some don’t offer information online and most say the best way to get a policy is to find an agent.

Company Call for a quote Find an agent
Insurers that offer the non-owner car coverage may not sell it in every state.

*USAA sells insurance only to active military members, veterans and their families.

Acceptance Insurance 877-405-7102  

 

American Family 800-692-6326  

 

Dairyland Insurance 844-242-4468  

 

Direct Auto Insurance 877-463-4732  

 

Farmers 888-327-6335  

 

Geico 800-207-7847  

 

Liberty Mutual 800-699-3534  

 

Nationwide 877-669-6877  

 

State Farm 800-782-8332  

 

Travelers 800-842-5075  

 

USAA* 800-531-8722  

 

What non-owner car insurance covers

A non-owner car insurance policy typically includes only the required coverage types in your state, though you can select limits higher than the minimums. These may include:

  • Liability coverage for property damage and injuries you cause to others, except your passengers.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist protection, which pays out if you’re injured in an accident caused by a driver without any or enough liability insurance.
  • Medical payments or personal injury protection, which pay for your injuries after a wreck no matter who is at fault.

Non-owner insurance doesn’t include collision or comprehensive insurance. In a standard auto policy, that coverage pays for repairs or replacement of the vehicle you own.

Who needs non-owner car insurance

You might want a non-owner insurance policy if you don’t own a vehicle and you:

  • Need an SR-22 form filed on your behalf — or an FR-44 form in Florida and Virginia — to get your driver’s license reinstated. These forms are filed by insurers and prove that you have car insurance after a serious conviction like a DUI.
  • Your state requires insurance to get or reinstate a drivers license. Some states do so under what is sometimes called a “proof of financial responsibility” law.
  • Use a service such as Zipcar or Car2Go: A non-owner policy supplements the liability coverage the car-sharing service provides, typically the minimum-required amount in your state. If you cause a bad wreck, costs could easily exceed those limits and you’d be responsible for them.
  • Want to maintain continuous auto insurance coverage: Going without coverage — even between cars — makes you look risky in the eyes of insurers, leading to higher rates when you buy a vehicle.
  • Rent cars frequently: Non-owner insurance might be cheaper than paying for liability coverage at the rental counter if you rent often enough. It won’t cover damage to the rental, but you may be able to get that coverage through a credit card or buy the collision-damage waiver from the rental car company.
  • Borrow other people’s cars often: The car owner’s insurance normally pays out for an accident, but if costs exceed the owner’s liability limits, you’d be on the hook for the remainder.

Cost of a non-owner policy

Typically, a non-owner car insurance policy costs less than what you would pay for the same level of liability coverage for a car you own. However, if you need the insurer to file an SR-22 or FR-44, costs will likely be high for any policy until you don’t need it anymore.

The price depends on your age, driving record and how often you plan to drive, in addition to other factors.

Non-owner car insurance provides liability coverage when you don’t have a car and drive one that isn’t yours. Liability coverage pays for injuries and property damage you cause to others in a car accident. However, it doesn’t cover any damage to the car you’ve borrowed or rented, nor does it pay for any of your own injuries if you cause a crash.

Beware: If you borrow a car from a relative or someone in your home, non-owner car insurance isn’t the right choice — you should be listed on the car owner’s policy. Depending on their insurer and your state, this might be required even if the car belongs to an unrelated roommate, and even if you don’t currently have a valid license.

How to buy non-owner car insurance

To get a quote, you’ll need to make a call or visit an agent. Insurers don’t tend to offer non-owner insurance quotes online, and some, like Progressive, offer them only to existing customers. And though most large insurers offer non-owner car insurance, Allstate does not.

We’ve verified that the insurers below offer non-owner policies, but some don’t offer information online and most say the best way to get a policy is to find an agent.

Company Call for a quote Find an agent
Insurers that offer the non-owner car coverage may not sell it in every state.

*USAA sells insurance only to active military members, veterans and their families.

Acceptance Insurance 877-405-7102  

 

American Family 800-692-6326  

 

Dairyland Insurance 844-242-4468  

 

Direct Auto Insurance 877-463-4732  

 

Farmers 888-327-6335  

 

Geico 800-207-7847  

 

Liberty Mutual 800-699-3534  

 

Nationwide 877-669-6877  

 

State Farm 800-782-8332  

 

Travelers 800-842-5075  

 

USAA* 800-531-8722  

 

What non-owner car insurance covers

A non-owner car insurance policy typically includes only the required coverage types in your state, though you can select limits higher than the minimums. These may include:

  • Liability coverage for property damage and injuries you cause to others, except your passengers.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist protection, which pays out if you’re injured in an accident caused by a driver without any or enough liability insurance.
  • Medical payments or personal injury protection, which pay for your injuries after a wreck no matter who is at fault.

Non-owner insurance doesn’t include collision or comprehensive insurance. In a standard auto policy, that coverage pays for repairs or replacement of the vehicle you own.

Who needs non-owner car insurance

You might want a non-owner insurance policy if you don’t own a vehicle and you:

  • Need an SR-22 form filed on your behalf — or an FR-44 form in Florida and Virginia — to get your driver’s license reinstated. These forms are filed by insurers and prove that you have car insurance after a serious conviction like a DUI.
  • Your state requires insurance to get or reinstate a drivers license. Some states do so under what is sometimes called a “proof of financial responsibility” law.
  • Use a service such as Zipcar or Car2Go: A non-owner policy supplements the liability coverage the car-sharing service provides, typically the minimum-required amount in your state. If you cause a bad wreck, costs could easily exceed those limits and you’d be responsible for them.
  • Want to maintain continuous auto insurance coverage: Going without coverage — even between cars — makes you look risky in the eyes of insurers, leading to higher rates when you buy a vehicle.
  • Rent cars frequently: Non-owner insurance might be cheaper than paying for liability coverage at the rental counter if you rent often enough. It won’t cover damage to the rental, but you may be able to get that coverage through a credit card or buy the collision-damage waiver from the rental car company.
  • Borrow other people’s cars often: The car owner’s insurance normally pays out for an accident, but if costs exceed the owner’s liability limits, you’d be on the hook for the remainder.

Cost of a non-owner policy

Typically, a non-owner car insurance policy costs less than what you would pay for the same level of liability coverage for a car you own. However, if you need the insurer to file an SR-22 or FR-44, costs will likely be high for any policy until you don’t need it anymore.

The price depends on your age, driving record and how often you plan to drive, in addition to other factors.